Friday, May 24, 2024

Immigration arrest 17 suspected Ethiopian prohibited immigrants

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The Department of Immigration has apprehended Seventeen (17) suspected prohibited immigrants in Chongwe’s Silverest area.

The seventeen who are suspected of Ethiopian Origin were apprehended following information received from the Zambia Police, who had received a report of suspected prohibited immigrants at Kapwelyomba Farm on Great East Road.

“Acting on information from the Zambia Police, who had received a report of the presence of suspected prohibited immigrants at Kapwelyomba Farm along Great East Road by some Security guards while conducting routine patrols within the Farm, the Officers rushed to the scene and found a total number of seventeen (17) suspected prohibited immigrants of Ethiopian origin,” she said.

In a press statement released to ZANIS, Immigration Acting Public Relations Officer Josephine Malambo said investigations have since been instituted to establish how the suspects landed at the farm as well as establish the identity of the farm owner.

Ms Malambo disclosed that the immigrants are all male aged between 12 and 25 years and that the case is therefore being treated as a case of suspected human trafficking.

“Investigations have been instituted to find out how the immigrants found themselves at the said location as well as identify the owner of the farm. The immigrants are all male, aged between 12 and 25 and thus, the matter is being treated as a case of suspected human trafficking,” she added.

She has further disclosed that the immigrants have since been transferred to Mwembeshi Correctional Facility together with the 18 immigrants that were apprehended earlier in the morning in Lusaka’s Kaunda Square Stage II by the Zambia Police, pending further immigration formalities.

Meanwhile, Police in Lusaka in the early hours of today intercepted and apprehended 15 prohibited immigrants believed to be Ethiopians.

And 18 more suspected prohibited immigrants who escaped a police drag net in the early hours of today, have been cornered bringing a total of 33 suspected prohibited immigrants in custody.

The first 15 suspects were apprehended in Kaunda Square Stage II around 01:00 hours this morning.

Zambia Police Service Deputy Police Public Relations Officer Danny Mwale has confirmed the arrests to the media in Lusaka yesterday.

Mr Mwale said police officers manning Mono Police Check point along the Great East Road in Silverest area got suspicious after three mini buses passed them at high speed without stopping.

He said Police officers pursued the mini buses and intercepted one mini bus, a Toyota Haice, bearing registration number AIB 4244 and fleet number 211065 off Simusokwe Road in Kaunda Square Stage II where they apprehended 13 suspects.

Mr Mwale said after interrogations, it was discovered that the suspects were 20 in the mini bus and seven including the driver managed to escape immediately they noticed that they were being pursued by police officers.

The Deputy Police Public Relations Officer added that police ‘combed’ the area in Kaunda Square and later apprehended two suspects around 02:30 hours.

Mr Mwale said that initial investigations indicate that the suspects entered Zambia through Mwami Border in Eastern Province.

“All the 15 suspects were taken in police custody awaiting to be formally handed over to the Department of Immigration,” said Mr Mwale.

8 COMMENTS

  1. The Horn of Africa is bleeding and these are the effects. It’s painful and embarrassing that the AU whose HQs is in the region has failed to raise this issue. Our leaders gather to read empty speeches year in and year out. South Sudan will soon add to the list. South Africa can’t take it anymore and will soon explode. We know the reasons people are running away from their countries. Why can’t our leaders boldly deal with the instability in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia and now South Sudan? The spill over effects of that instability will affect the whole region. The time to deal with it is now

  2. Department of Immigration need to realise that area of East Lusaka seems to be a stop over point hence you find dead bodies in Meanwood…these people are not even interested in Zambia just let them go to where they are going RSA. Let the SA govt pay for deportation of these Ethophians or else we will have prisons full of them.

  3. The fact, these numbers of people are managing to enter Zambia – apparently undetected at ‘supposed’ Borders – suggests thousands have done this in recent years; and either continued to intended destination, or settled in Zambia under radar. This will undoubtedly have placed a heavy financial burden on Zambia – as these people have to be fed and cared for whilst in immigration detention & until safely sent home or granted asylum status. Perhaps, Zambia should now engage the UN for help.

    • Zennia – Zambia is just a transit point or a rest stop like Libya is a transit point for illegal immagrants wanting to cross into Europe..there is nothing in Zambia but in SA there is employment for them as they have Networks there and no Ethophian businessman would trust a lazy South African to work in their business. There organised gangs involved in this illegal operations that need the co-operation of all countries on this route especially SA. ZP can not even find who dumped those bodies in Meanwood.

  4. Sad to see what is happening with our Ethiopian brothers, we should not be treating them like they are criminals. They need counseling by their govt and IOM representatives on why the journey to SA is not all it seems and why they should remain in their country, Ethiopia to make it more productive. Once they are counselled then send them back to Ethiopia as soon as possible without imprisoning them. They have already been traumatized why add to their stress? God is watching us and will judge is harshly for mistreating our brothers.

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