Indian Doctors expected in Zambia to treat congenital heart diseases

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A team of specialized doctors from India’s Apollo Hospitals is on Monday, expected in Zambia to treat children suffering from congenital heart diseases.

Zambia’s High Commissioner to India Judith Kapinjimpanga says this follows discussions between the Zambian Mission in New Delhi and India’s leading hospitals to help over 400 children who cannot afford to travel to India for specialized services.

Ministry of Health Permanent Secretary Jabbin Mulwanda was in India recently where he mentioned that he had over 400 children in Zambia are on the waiting list seeking government sponsorship for heart diseases operation.

And Apollo Hospitals Vice President for Corporate Development Harinder Sing Sidhu says his institution will set up a screening camp in Lusaka next week to cut on costs.

Dr. Sidhu says his team will evaluate on- site surgery options so that less complicated cases can be treated in Zambia using the equipment they will carry adding that children will be treated in batches of 25.

He says complicated cases will have to be referred to India at a subsidized cost.

This is according to a statement released by First Secretary Press and Tourism at the Zambian Mission in New Delhi, Bangwe Navilley.

11 COMMENTS

  1. +3
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    Sad story….50yrs post independence ,we cannot do simple heart operations. Collective effort is needed to normalize the situation.Otherwise, India is reaping!

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      These indian help for children, are better development and services than Kalaba in Russia.

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    Why is the focus on the surgery options Instead of focusing on preventative measures? Does it mean you can not prevent congenital heart disease?

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      @Lombe, next time you go to Zambia watch your back. You think those people murders and their hearts sold to Indians are resting in peace?

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      Congenital means that it is present from birth.
      Whilst some conditions are possible to prevent with sufficient public health awareness, there are several factors that make this difficult to do. Firstly and maybe most importantly, most women only start attending antenatal services after three months of pregnancy when the majority of the congenital problems have already occurred.
      Secondly, our primary health care services are overwhelmed – something one wont see if they spend most of their time in private care. The nurses do a good job in trying to educate the pregnant women but providing lectures to a group of women and then examining more than 50 in one sitting can be quite a challenge.
      Most importantly, healthcare isn’t considered a priority in the Zambian setting because everyone…

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    Well alright some doctors from India will be in the country to help a situation that has not received attention by the Ministry of Health to ensure capacity is built so Zambia can have home grown personnel (experts) in our hospitals! Shared sentiment @ Gjc!

    Has anyone given explanation to a report recently carried that 800+ deaths were recorded at UTH in a period of less than a month? This is scandalous and lawmakers cannot just let it melt away for this does not mean well for the country’s top referral hospital!

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      There needs to be tighter control of all the mushrooming health facilities and all the “big” private hospitals who refer patients to UTH when they are about to give up the ghost.
      I think data needs to be collected on where the people who died were initially treated and for how long. “Naming and shaming” might empower the people to know what private hospitals or clinics to avoid, but also help the Ministry of Health can flag and follow up on these facilities.

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    Comment:Fortis escort Newdelhi India is the best hospital in the world,ilove the all those guys ,it is aheart institute ,where this problem is treated,at Okla road,I have just come from there.

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