Sorenson Forensics has announced that as part of an unprecedented public-private partnership, three forensic scientists from Zambia have travelled to its Utah-based lab for six weeks of intensive, hands-on training, marking the first step in launching the African country’s first-ever forensic DNA lab.

The partnership was formed between the Georgian Foundation, four ministries of Zambian government and Sorenson Forensics, and aims to reduce the incidence of child sexual abuse through the establishment of an accredited forensic DNA laboratory in the Republic of Zambia.

While working at the Sorenson Forensics lab, the scientists from Zambia’s Ministry of Home Affairs will receive valuable training on new forensic procedures, such as DNA analysis, that they can take with them when they return home.

Sorenson Forensics is a private forensic DNA laboratory built on a foundation of collaborative forensics, and was selected to be a part of this initiative because of its stellar reputation of providing DNA casework services for federal, state and local crime laboratories, as well as its experience in developing forensic DNA laboratories in other African countries.

After the six-week intensive training period, scientists from Sorenson Forensics will travel to Zambia to begin helping with the next phase of the project to establish the country’s first forensic DNA laboratory facilities.

The lab will help law enforcement agencies increase the effectiveness of prosecuting child sexual assault cases through the collection and timely processing of forensic DNA evidence.

“It is an honor to participate in such an important undertaking,” said Craig Nolde, biotechnical solutions manager at Sorenson Forensics. “There is a definite need for improved forensic resources in Zambia, and because our lab is equipped with the most advanced methods for forensic DNA analysis, we are able to provide guest scientists with a comprehensive education in casework processes and procedures. Over the next six weeks we will build a solid foundation upon which these talented scientists will be able to participate in creating a successful forensic DNA lab in Zambia.”

“Child sexual abuse and gender-based violence are all too prevalent in Zambia, and currently we don’t have any DNA capabilities to meet the forensic needs to process the forensic biology cases,” said Katongo Chipompo, assistant commissioner of police – forensic unit. “After two years of planning, we are excited to be here and begin the training to create the new lab so we will be able to better help law enforcement bring justice to the victims of these crimes and start to eradicate this horrible epidemic.”

Sorenson Forensics has extensive experience providing this level of outreach and education to international forensic scientists, having played a critical role in helping to establish similar forensic DNA labs in both Nigeria and Senegal. Additionally, Sorenson Forensics has previously been involved in improving Zambia’s ability to more successfully prosecute criminal actions through the use of forensic evidence. In 2011, as part of a global outreach program, Sorenson Forensics hosted a group of forensic scientists, police agents and human rights advocates from Zambia so they could gain a greater understanding of the procedures of a forensic DNA laboratory.

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22 COMMENTS

    • This when its being done after 50years of independence!! wow

      By the way i can offer skills also in those lines photoFIT generation, facial composition,,,putting a face to a skull,,digital or/and otherwise

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    • While HH is busy running his mouth. I guess he will object to this too? All you child molesters be ware

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    • Daniel Mwamba aka Mushota is a backward f.oo.l with an inferiority complex! What is this obsession with colourism?

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    • @Ndobo, c’mon man. Apart from SA and Egypt, which other country in Africa let alone the Southern Hemisphere are known for well developed forensics labs? Though late by your timeline, it’s a good start.

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  1. As long as these people come back and share their new knowledge with everyone else. They shouldn’t come back demanding stupidly high salaries.

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    • Didnt Dr Msiska ask for many to trek back to zed in yesterdays article, people were busy saying they cant leave, now i see envy…. kidding maybe if you volunteer your skills for 10 years they might just let you in, thats if you get lucky otherwise, you will be another Clive Chirwa, mind you they are allergic to diasporians!

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  2. Someone will faint in the field make sure you give them murder assignments not sex abusive cases……. hehehehehehehehe, well done atleast some thing concrete coming out after 50 years its never too late to get there, genesis for everything.

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  3. Our CEO’ for the company i work for has a son who was sent to Zambia recently and he was in the forefront of educating our cops and investigators in this field.I wonder if this is the same team.

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  4. Good News But why three and not more… these are the types of partnerships our gov’t should be fostering. Next we should retire all traffic cops in the national interest, invest in ICT and let the US train the new recruits in modern traffic policing methods.

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  5. Still won’t work. Get rid of corruption first.

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  6. Im very happy that we should be able to trace child molesters. Hope these three guys will be at UNZA school of medicine

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  7. Sorenson Forensics is training Katongo Chipompo, the assistant police commissioner in Zambia, and two of his colleagues in an effort to establish the first DNA laboratory in Zambia. The lab will use the sophisticated evidence procedures to make headway against sex crimes. You can visit http://www.sorensonforensics.com for additional information on the partnership and our DNA forensic services or visit our Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/sorensonforensics, for images and other generally relevant postings.

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