Students in a 7th grade reading class at the Lufutuko Community School in Kabwe, Zambia, listen as Mrs. Bush reads the book that she and Mrs. Jenna Bush-Hagar authored titled, Read All About It, on Monday, July 2, 2012. Mutinta Mwananyanda (center), Founder, Lufutuko Community School, and a teacher, look on. The teacher is one of four teachers, including a supervisor, who share the duties of the 2 class sessions. Photo by Shealah Craighead/The Bush Center
FILE: Students in a 7th grade reading class at the Lufutuko Community School in Kabwe, Zambia, listen as Mrs. Bush reads the book that she and Mrs. Jenna Bush-Hagar authored titled, Read All About It, on Monday, July 2, 2012. Mutinta Mwananyanda (center), Founder, Lufutuko Community School, and a teacher, look on. The teacher is one of four teachers, including a supervisor, who share the duties of the 2 class sessions. Photo by Shealah Craighead/The Bush Center

GOVERNMENT is in the process of introducing practising licences for teachers across the country.

The practising certificates will be regulated by the Teaching Council of Zambia following the enactment of the Teaching Professional Act by Parliament.

Deputy Minister in the Ministry of Education, Science, Vocational Training and Early Education David Mabumba disclosed this when he addressed teachers from various schools in Isoka district.

Mr Mabumba said the certificates will regulate the professional conduct of teachers.

He said unlicenced teachers will not be allowed to teach either in private or public schools.

“The Teaching Council will work with the Teaching Service Commission to establish your code of conduct, and paramount to that code of conduct, teachers will be required to be issued with a practicing certificates,” he said.

Mr Mabumba said once the Teaching Council is ready, it will sensitise teacher unions and the general membership on the code of ethics.

“If you are not issued with the practicing certificate, it means you cannot teach anywhere in this country. You can appeal to court.

“So, I am trying to warn you that before a code of conduct is put in place, let us reflect on our professional conduct. If it has not been good, it is high time you started reforming yourself,” Mr Mabumba said.

And Mr Mabumba has also challenged teachers to upgrade their qualifications if they are to be elevated.

He said teachers should position themselves for promotions as Government is currently upgrading 220 primary schools into secondary, constructing 118 secondary schools and six universities across the country.

“As we are expanding various educational infrastructure, you should position yourselves by upgrading your educational qualifications,” he said.

And Mr Mabumba has implored teachers and parents in general to promote the teaching of local languages in schools as a medium for instruction.

He said research has shown that a child who uses a local language is likely to learn quicker than the one who uses a foreign language.

“And the English language that we have been using in this country, in my own opinion, contributed to the poor quality of our educational system.

“As Zambians, if a child is speaking English, parents feel proud. And I get surprised with such parents, to be honest; it is shameful. You should be proud of your mother tongue,” he said.

Mr Mabumba said English should only be an additional subject as it is the official language.

He is impressed that since the introduction of local languages at primary school level, the pupils’ literacy has improved.

“Last year, when we introduced the new curriculum, it was only two weeks when I visited a school in Nchelenge, and children were able to read and word formation was impressive. I was very surprised.

“And so with your support as key stakeholders in the implementation programme, in the next few years, our children will be able to break through in terms of literacy at a tender age,” he said.

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9 COMMENTS

  1. When advocating mother-tongue implementation we often stop at simply learning the language instead of advocating for a wholesale translation of ALL subject matter into the local language. Yes, Science, Math, the works. The attraction of foreign language is because of the output that attracts us. Aside from English which came as a result of colonisation, we are running to learn Chinese because we are attracted by the output of that society. Let’s couple these license with a learning center that will develop these curricula into local language. Then learning will indeed be QUICKER.

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    • Why should they learn that which they already know. Learning a different language enhances brain power; ever heard of that Mr. Mabumba?

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    • Comment:do u stil offer the loans? What is the maximum amount and terms of repayment?

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  2. Teaching is not a profession to be licenced. It is a vocation, you will find problems because of various qualifications and expertise. To regulate teachers from kindergarten to university will be a challenge.

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    • Hold your fire!!!!! teaching is a profession in the sense that those recruited as teachers will have to undergo training. You can never be a teacher without being trained, even those who lecture law have to do teaching methodology/pedagogical to be real experts.

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  3. My problems with new curriculum… teaching/learning in mother-tongue:
    1. It limits places where a teacher can be deployed in Zambia. You can’t expect someone who doesn’t speak Lozi to be deployed to a school in Mongu, how will he/she function? Or one who doesn’t speak Luvale to be deployed to a school in Zambezi. So we are saying forget One Zambia, One Nation. Everyone go and teach children of his/her own tribe!!!
    2. It affects other professionals as well. If a Bemba speaking Doctor is working in Lunduzi, they might easily decide their children are finding it hard to study in Tumbuka. They will probably want them to study in their mother tongue too. So they will decide to relocate to a place where their children will learn in their mother tongue. Forget One Zambia, One Nation.

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    • Is this the man who was convicted for forging a NIPA certificate? And he is now in charge of education and advising teachers. Are we serious? Can anyone take him seriously? No wonder, his views dont make sense, or add value?

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  4. This is a different guy, the convict is Masumba the other is Mabumba the later is UK trained.
    The question is what value will it add to the performance of the teachers plus expenses.

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