Mopani Mines

A non-governmental organisation, Oxfam International says there is need for mining firms to re-invest at least 10 percent of their profits into communities of their operations.

Oxfam Education Manager, Twaambo Mutinta says it is unfortunate that mining communities lack basic things like schools and teaching and learning materials such text books, and desks despite the huge profits mines make in their areas.

ZANIS reports that Mr. Mutinta said it was thus only reasonable if 10 percent of the profits could be ploughed back in mining communities and channeled towards construction of schools in order to improve the learning standards of children.

Mr. Mutinta said his organization would continue pushing for all mining firms in the country to plough back into communities of operation.

The Oxfam Education Manager said this during a training workshop on how good governance of community schools can improve the learning environment for under privileged children, in Mufulira District, today.

Meanwhile Mr. Mutinta has bemoaned the low funding levels released to community schools in the country adding that the trend has resulted in poor quality of education delivery.

He said community schools in the country faced various challenges due to low funding and has negatively impacted the quality of education for underprivileged children.

Mr. Mutinta said many community schools lack adequate classroom space, books, desks, among other things.

He added that lack of trained teachers in many community schools is also negatively affecting the quality of education in community schools.

The Oxfam Education Manager has therefore appealed to government to deploy more teachers in community schools in order to improve the qu(ICT)ality of education.

He also appealed to government to increase funding to community schools, saying the children attending community schools had a right to education and therefore deserve access to quality education.

The aim of the workshop is to empower community school teachers, parents and communities with skills that would enable them lobby support from government and other stakeholders in order to improve the learning environment of vulnerable children.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. I was born and grew up in the mine townships and I can say that the mines since time immemorial have been doing tremendous work for the communities. They built houses, hospitals, township clinics, sports infrastructure, good township roads, cinema halls and many others. The current investors have come for core business ie to mine and sell copper. They’re not here to stay like the old miners. They’ve seen what happened to NCCM and RCM when KK repossessed the mines. Once bitten twice shy. Government must just tax them more and channel the money to development.

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    • Mines are a business who have to make profit for share holders, the people who invest their hard earned money in them. They are not a government to be doing community work. Thats the reason they pay various taxes.. Perhaps you can start your own business and share 10% with people sleeping.

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  2. They should not be urged. The need for mining firms to re-invest at least 10 percent of their profits into communities of their operations should be in their contracts.

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  3. We need to understand 2 things. Mines are businesses but in as much as they are such ,they have an obligation to contribute positively to the communities around them.

    Most would argue but understand that if u spread the 10% over a one year period its less than 1% per month of which i believe they can provide for in their financial records.

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