CTPD Executive Director Isaac Mwaipopo
CTPD Executive Director Isaac Mwaipopo

The Center for trade Policy and Development has expressed concerned with the manner in which the case involving the slaughtering of the animals of one Pemba Farmer and the subsequent auction of the carcasses of the animals was handled.

CTPD says the organization is particularly disturbed with reports of 8 carcasses that were reportedly missing from the original number of animals that were slaughtered.

“While we have heard that the said animals were burnt and that the vet officials did not need any permission or consent from the farmer to take the action they did, we are of the view that in the interest of transparency and accountability, this action should have been done in an open manner. The slaughter of the animals was a public thing which was all over the media and so should have been all other actions that followed,” said CTPD Executive Director Isaac Mwaipopo.

“Another thing we wish to express concerns on is the prolonged ban of the movement of livestock. While we appreciate the efforts that the government has put in place to contain the spread of the Foot and Mouth Disease, we should also not be oblivious to the fact that the livelihood of most of the farmers in the two areas largely depends on agriculture visa-vis crop farming and livestock farming,” he said.

“As a country we are all alive to the fact that the 2018/2019 farming season did not go well in the southern half of the country.”

Mr Mwaipopo said Zambia is expecting very low yields from the southern half of the country and that this means the government will be overwhelmed to provide relief food.

“Against this background, it is our considered view that the only window of hope for the farmers in the two affected provinces lies in their ability to maximize revenue generation for their livestock. As such a prolonged ban on the movement of their only viable source of income is suicidal not just for the farmers affected but for the government too.”

“As CTPD, we would like to call upon the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries to step up and address the problem in Southern and Eastern Province with the urgency that it deserves. If left unchecked it may escalate into a national crisis.”

He said the affected farmers who are growing impatient every passing day may resort to smuggling their animals out of the affected provinces as a survival strategy.

Mr Mwaipopo said this can be prevented by a more proactive approach on the part of the government.

“We would also like to urge our government to invest more money in the veterinary departments of our country. Animal health and welfare requires substantial investments.”

He added, “We have observed with sadness that we tend to be very reactive every time a crisis befalls us as opposed to being proactive. We know as a country that we are so prone to tick borne diseases.”

“This is the more reason we ought to invest in technologies that can control ticks. It would be a bad idea to roll out a program of sinking several dip tanks in all constituencies and farming camps. This should also go hand in hand with the equipping the veterinary departments all over the country with the right tools and support systems as they carry out their work.”

Mr Mwaipopo said CTPD knows that the Zambian government knows the huge potential in the livestock sector that is why they informed the country not so long ago of a huge market for goats and sheep in Saudi Arabia.

“If we are to tap into that market, we will need to invest more in animal disease control. Available statistics indicate that Fisheries and livestock play an important role in Zambia’s agriculture sector, together accounting for 35 percent of the agricultural GDP. With the right incentives and support structure in place, the livestock sector can make even more meaningful contributions to the country’s overall GDP.”

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15 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks CTPD, the act was inhuman, it is excessive and heartless. Why would anyone do that to another and only to sale the same animals.

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    • “Another thing we wish to express concerns on is the prolonged ban of the movement of livestock. While we appreciate the efforts that the government has put in place to contain the spread of the Foot and Mouth Disease, we should also not be oblivious to the fact that the livelihood of most of the farmers in the two areas largely depends on agriculture visa-vis crop farming and livestock farming,” he said.

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    • A simple question did they test the animals before they were slaughtered? Also how much did they entire exercise of slaughtering those animals cost?

      Then you wonder why we don’t develop. How can we when we have such retrogressive minds in govt, that are receiving a full salary and allowances only to make life difficult for their fellow citizens they want to make themselves bosses rather than servants which is what they swore an oath to do when taking office.

      God will judge them accordingly.

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  2. Let’s sue the Govn’t and have that decision judicially reviewed. We cannot be a progressive country by continuing allowing Govn’t acting illegally on issues that affect it’s citizens, communities and corporate organisations.

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    • Let’s stop it there. The man might be persecuted for moving these animals illegally. It’s a very serious case. He should quickly say sorry to the govt. If we talk to much the man might be attested . Law is law…

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  3. The law should be applied firmly regardless of who is involved. The law was created for a purpose. Once you start creating exceptions then you open the door to anarchy.

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  4. Legal action is best way because repeating the same condemnation is not helping the farmer.The action was immoral.We need to know whether this action shown and demonstrated publicly was meant please the powers that be persecution of Tongas to earn a promotion.We have seen this repeatedly in the public service

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    • @Melly

      I don’t think proper procedures were followed. So far there is no evidence supporting that these animals were effected. Yes the man was wrong but it was wrong to kill the animals when they did not pose a risk?. Destroying the animals was ultra vire when they did not pose an risk and the onus is on the authorities to prove their course of action which I think it was irrational.

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  5. Can we, first of all, understand what the law that supports the ban on movement of livestock says…………so sad to the farmer and condolences to the vet officer who sanctioned the slaughter.

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  6. Mwe Bantu mulekwato luse, in the first place, was this man warned before or that was his first time to do such a thing? What was difficult just to tell him to go back with his animals or simply charge him and let him pay rather killing his animals? How many times have we gone against Our Creator’s direction? See how forgiving, kind, merciful he is! Having been created in his image, surely we to show his qualities to our fellow human beings. I presume animals were disease free but why hobstly killing them? Were they posing danger to anyone? Ndefilwa ukunfwikisha mwe.

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  7. If those were my animals, I would have made sure all involved become Chinama patients!
    The traditional justice system is especially more efficient when blood of animals is shed!
    Suing in Zambia can just drain your pocket for nothing!

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    • You will be arrested for illegal movement of animals. Us we have animals we obeyed we not moving them or selling..

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  8. Some are asking to either rewrite the law or to selectively apply the law depending on how wealthy the cattle owner may be

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  9. It isn’t the humane slaughtering of animals.It is from a moralist point of view.An end to the killing of animals altogether.There is nothing wrong with being vegetarian.When you harvest fruit or harvest bananas you are not killing the tree.Peter Carlos Hinds.

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