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Alba Iulia
Sunday, September 26, 2021

Regional Projects and Programmes

Columns Regional Projects and Programmes

By Henry Kyambalesa

A Comment on the “Debt Swap” Initiative

I will start this article with an opinion on the initiative introduced recently by the Patriotic Front (PF) administration referred to as the “debt swap,” which is essentially designed to facilitate the cancellation of payroll loans owed to the government by any given civil servant in exchange for money owed to the civil servant by the government.

A civil servant may owe money to the government in the form of payroll loans obtained for such purposes as paying hospital fees, purchasing medicines, meeting a family’s subsistence or basic needs, catering for funeral expenses, paying school fees, acquiring an automobile, purchasing a plot of land, and/or purchasing a housing unit.

The government, on the other hand, may owe money to any given civil servant in the form of leave pay, settling-in allowance, long-service bonus, and so forth.

The “debt swap” arrangement is not useful for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is going to deprive civil servants of expected and budgeted-for income in the form of leave pay, settling-in allowance and/or long-service bonus which they desperately need for paying off loans secured from shylocks and settling other unpaid family expenses.

Secondly, “debt swaps” are not a solution to the overwhelming hardships facing civil servants and their families due to insufficient wages and salaries. Thirdly, civil servants constitute only a tiny fraction of the country’s 18 million people who have continued to endure unimaginable hardships and who have continued to expect the PF government to create the necessary economic conditions in which they can improve their own lives.

Fourthly, “debt forgiveness” would have been a more useful arrangement because it would have provided a bit of relief to civil servants especially if the government would have been in a position to promptly settle the amounts owed to them in the form of leave pay, settling-in allowance, long-service bonus, and so forth.

And fifthly, the pursuit of “debt swaps” is a clear indication that the government is seriously in debt and is, therefore, incapable of paying the amounts owing to civil servants let alone meeting its other financial obligations.

So, instead of spending time, energy and resources strategising on how to extract votes from the citizenry through the “debt swap” arrangement and the showering of donations and gifts of cash, vehicles, bicycles, and mealie meal on chieftains and societal groups during an election year, PF officials should have directed their efforts at addressing the extraordinary hardships which have been facing the country and the common people over the last 10 years the ruling political party has been in power.

The unemployment situation, for example, is not only heartbreaking but unimaginable. As Ambassador Emmanuel Mwamba has noted, only 900,000 people in a country of 18 or so million citizens are employed in the formal sector.

We urgently need a government that will create millions upon millions of jobs in order to give our fellow citizens the opportunity to earn a decent living. I suggested how this can be done in an article entitled “Good News for Zambians.”

In fact, the widespread violence in the country is partly a result of having millions of capable youth roaming the streets without jobs. As an age-old cliché advises us, “An idle mind is the devil’s workshop.”

To exaggerate a bit, PF officials must have been on vacation over the last 10 years, caring less or not at all about the consistently declining economic conditions in the country. I am even reminded of the following excerpt from one of the reports by Social Watch cited by Bivan Saluseki, which accurately reflects the unimaginable situation in Zambia today as it was several years ago:

Even though the country has not formally been at war since independence in 1964, prevailing conditions affecting human existence are equivalent to those in a country at war.”

The UPND Alliance is much more likely to reverse the current socioeconomic decay and backwardness and improve the socioeconomic vistas of our people over the next 5 years because its administration will draw from the knowledge, expertise and experience of leaders from members of the Alliance who, by and large, hail from the country’s 10 provinces. This is actually one of the most important strengths of the UPND Alliance.

Let me be absolutely clear about the reason why I have maintained the momentum in faulting the PF and its officials concerning the dismal performance of our country’s economy—it is not because I hate them or have a grudge against them; it is simply because I have an unquenchable desire to contribute to the debate regarding our beloved country’s future and the socioeconomic wellbeing of ordinary citizens. After all, we are all members of the Zambian family and must be willing to protect each other from unnecessary suffering.

Allow me now to delve into a brief discussion of some of the regional projects and programmes the next administration will need to tend to over the next 5 or so years. Projects and programmes that need to be tended to in North-Western Province are not discussed in this article because they were presented in a separate article entitled “Development in North-Western Province.”

1. Central Province

1.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, as well as rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Central Province and to build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the Province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries, mining companies or the Zambian government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the Province, including Liteta, Kapiri Mposhi, Mkushi, Mumbwa, Nangoma, Chitambo, Serenje, and Kabwe hospitals.

1.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Central Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chibombo, Itezhi-Tezhi, Kabwe, Kapiri Mposhi, Mkushi, Mumbwa, Serenje, and Shibuyunji districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Central Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Central Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Central Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

1.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Central Province, including the following:

(a) The Inchibwela Mushi ceremony of the Bisa, Swaka and Lala people in Mkushi district held in September;

(b) The Kulamba Kubwalo ceremony of the Lenje people in Senior Chief Mukuni’s area in Chibombo district held in October;

(c ) The Musaka and Jikubi ceremonies of the Kaonde people in Chiefs Mumba and Kaindu’s areas in Mumbwa district held in September; and

(d) The Likumbi Lya Malumbe ceremony of the Kaonde-Ila people in Chief Chibuluma’s area in Mumbwa district held in October.

1.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Central Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for both rural and urban areas throughout the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(b) Promotion of large-scale investments in Central Province, such as that made in recent years by Chiman Manufacturing Limited from China in the development of the manganese plant at the old Kabwe Mine, and at the company’s Kampumba Mine in Mkushi district. This is one of the obvious ways in which we can create greater employment opportunities for residents in the province.

(c) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such schemes include the Amatheon (Germany) farm block in Mumbwa district, the Kampundu Resettlement Scheme in Chitambo district, the Kanyesha Resettlement Scheme in Mkushi district, the Katikulula Resettlement Scheme in Chitambo district, the Lukanda Resettlement Scheme in Kapri Mposhi district, the Maimwene Resettlement Scheme in Serenje district, the Masasabi Resettlement Scheme in Itezhi-Tezhi district, and the Nansanga / Munte farm block in Serenje district.

2. Copperbelt Province

2.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout the Copperbelt Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries, mining companies or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the Copperbelt Province, including the Konkola Mine Hospital, Nchanga South Hospital, Kalulushi Mine Hospital, Nkana Mine Hospital, Wusakile Hospital, Luanshya Mine Hospital, Roan Antelope Hospital, Thomson District Hospital, Mpongwe Mission Hospital, St. Theresa Mission Hospital, Kamuchanga Hospital, and Malcom Watson Hospital.

2.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in the Copperbelt Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chililabombwe, Chingola, Kalulushi, Kitwe, Luanshya, Lufwanyama, Masaiti, Mpongwe, Mufulira, and Ndola districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in the Copperbelt Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in the Copperbelt Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout the Copperbelt Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

2.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in the Copperbelt Province, including the following:

(a) The Chabalankata ceremony of the Lamba people in Masaiti district in Senior Chief Mushili’s area held in November;

(b) The Chitentamo and Nsengele Kununka ceremonies of the Lamba people in Chief Machiya’s area in Mpongwe held in November; and

(c) The Kwilimuna ceremony of the Bulima people in Chieftainess Malembeka’s area in Mpongwe district held in July/August.

2.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in the Copperbelt Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Ensuring that the relocation of shanty townships is conducted only after low-cost public housing units are provided by the government, and re-settlement areas are furni­shed with running wat­er, elec­tricity, public tran­sporta­tion routes and por­tals, and other essential public ser­vices and facili­ties.

(b) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for both rural and urban areas in the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(c) Ensuring that garbage collection and disposal are undertaken on a more regular basis, and provide adequate resources to facilitate the effective control of mosquitoes to reduce the incidence of malaria.

(d) Extension of credit facilities to enterprising citizens who want to get involved in the informal sector of the economy.

(e) Embarking on an ambitious programme designed to improve the infrastructure of health institutions throughout the province, including mortuaries, laboratories, voluntary testing centres for HIV/AIDS (VTCs), and other essential facilities.

(f) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such schemes include the Chifulube Resettlement Scheme in Luanshya district, the Kafubu West Dam Resettlement Scheme, the Kakolo Resettlement Scheme in Kitwe district, the Kambilombilo Resettlement Scheme in Lufwanyama district, the Lufwanyama Resettlement Scheme in Lufwanyama district, the Lukanga North in Mpongwe district, the Luswishi Resettlement Scheme in Lufwanyama district, the Miengwe Resettlement Scheme in Masaiti district, the Milyashi Resettlement Scheme in Chililabombwe district, the Musakashi Resettlement Scheme in Kalulushi (Mufulira?) district, the Mutenda Resettlement Scheme in Chingola district, and the Mutundu Resettlement Scheme in Mufulira district.

3. Eastern Province

3.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Eastern Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—that is, the Mwami Mission, Lundazi District, Kamoto Mission, Nyimba, Minga Mission, Njanje, Petauke, Chipata General, and St. Francis hospitals.

Further, There is a need to improve the availability of safe and clean water for both rural and urban areas through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

3.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Eastern Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chadiza, Chama, Chipata, Katete, Lundazi, Mambwe, Nyimba, Petauke, Sinda, and Vubwi districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Eastern Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Eastern Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Eastern Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

3.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Eastern Province, including the following:

(a) The N’cwala ceremony of the Ngoni people in Paramount Chief Mpezeni’s area in Chipata district held in February;

(b) The Kulamba ceremony of the Chewa people in Paramount Chief Gawa Undi’s area in Katete district held in August;

(c) The Tuwimba ceremony of the Nsenga people in Senior Chief Kalindawalo’s area in Petauke district held in October;

(d) The Malaila ceremony of the Kunda people in Senior Chief Nsefu’s area in Mambwe district held in October; and

(e) The Kwenje ceremony of the Tumbuka people in Senior Chief Kambombo’s area in Chama district held in October.

3.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Eastern Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Maintenance of the Chipata-Mchinji rail project which was initiated in 1982 as a joint venture involving Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique during the UNIP administration; and facilitation of the creation of the planned Shire-Zambezi Waterway designed to open up a cheap transport route for imports and exports by connecting Zambia to the Indian Ocean port of Chinde in Mozambique through the inland port of Njase on Shire River in Malawi.

(b) Construction of an international airport in Chipata district similar to the Chileka Airport in Blantyre in neighbouring Malawi.

(c) Upgrading of both Chadiza and Nyimba clinics into district hospitals, and enhanced control of mosquito breeding throughout the province.

(d) Provide for the construction and rehabilitation of irrigation dams, canals, bridges, and trunk roads.

(e) Promotion of the small-scale mining industry through low-interest loans, and processing industries to process cotton, tobacco, sunflower, groundnuts, and other products within the province.

(f) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for both rural and urban areas through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(g) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such schemes include the Chipangali-Madziatuba Resettlement Scheme, the Chipangali-Rukuzye Resettlement Scheme, the Mlolo Resettlement Scheme in Chadiza district, the Mwase-Phangwe farm block in Lundazi district, and the Petauke Resettlement Scheme in Petauke district.

4. Luapula Province

4.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Luapula Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—examples of which include the Kawambwa, Mbereshi Mission, Mambilima, Kashikishi, St. Pauls, Lubwe Mission, St. Margaret / Kasaba, and Mansa hospitals.

4.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Luapula Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chembe, Chiengi, Chipili, Kawambwa, Lunga, Mansa, Milenge, Mwansabombwe, Mwense, Nchelenge, and Samfya districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Luapula Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Luapula Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Luapula Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

4.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Luapula Province, including the following:

(a) The Kwanga ceremony of the Ng’umbo people in Senior Chief Mwewa’s area in Samfya district held in October;

(b) The Mabila ceremony of the Shila people in Senior Chief Mununga’s area in Chiengi district held in October;

(c) The Mutomboko ceremony of the Lunda people in Senior Chief Mwata Kazembe’s area in Kawambwa district held in July;

(d) The Bwile ceremony of the Bwile people in Senior Chief Puta’s area in Chiengi district held in September;

(e) The Chishinga Malaila ceremony of the Chishinga people in Senior Chief Mushota’s area in Kawambwa district held in October;

(f) The Chabuka ceremony of the Ushi people in Chief Matanda’s area in Mansa district held in September or October; and

(g) The Makumba ceremony of the Ushi people in Chief Mabumba’s area in Mansa district held in August.

4.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Luapula Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Completion of the bridge on Mukubwe River at Kaungu in order to make it easy for our fellow citizens in Senior Chief Nsama and Chief Mukupa Katandula’s areas to cross the river. The Mukubwe Bridge is important as it connects Luapula Province and Northern Province on a short-cut road from Mununga in Chiengi district to Senior Chief Nsama in Kaputa district.

(b) Ensuring that travelling between the Copperbelt and Luapula provinces is made easier and safer by financing the maintenance of the Levy Mwanawasa Bridge at Chembe border post. We trust that the contractor that has constructed the Bridge—that is, China Henan International Corporation (CHICO)—has done a good job in ensuring that it (the bridge) will have the expected lifespan of at least 300 years.

(c) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water in the province through boreholes, dams, piped water, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(d) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities. Such schemes include the Kapako Resettlement Scheme, the Luena farm block in Kawambwa district, the Mano Resettlement Scheme in Samfya district, the Mansa Resettlement Scheme in Mansa district, the Mukanga in Mwense district, the Mwense Resettlement Scheme in Mwense district.

(e) Ensuring that the tourism potential in the Northern-Luapula Circuit is fully exploited through: (i) improved airport infrastructure; (ii) well-maintained roads leading to wildlife sanctuaries, waterfalls, lakes, beaches along Lake Bangweulu in Samfya, and other heritage sites; and

(f) Inducement of private investments in tourism camps, lodges and hotels.

5. Lusaka Province

5.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Lusaka Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, ttere is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries, mining companies or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—such as the Mpanshya / St. Luke, Katondwe Sacred Heart, Hill Top, Lusaka Mine, Maina Soko, and Monica Chiumya hospitals. Besides, there is a need to embark on an ambitious programme designed to improve the infrastructure of health institutions throughout the province, including mortuaries, laboratories, voluntary testing centres for HIV/AIDS (VTCs), and other essential facilities.

5.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Lusaka Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chilanga, Chirundu, Chongwe, Kafue, Luangwa, Lusaka, and Rufunsa districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Lusaka Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Lusaka Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Lusaka Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

5.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Lusaka Province, including the following:

(a) The Mbambala ceremony of the Nsenga-Luzi people in Senior Chief Mburuma’s area in Luangwa district held in November;

(b) The Chibwela Kumushi ceremony of the Soli people in Chief Bunda Bunda’s area in Chinyunyu held in November; and

(c) The Kailala ceremony of the Goba people in Chieftainess Chiawa’s area in Kafue district held in September.

5.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Lusaka Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Ensuring that garbage collection and disposal are undertaken on a more regular basis, and providing adequate resources to facilitate the effective control of mosquitoes to reduce the incidence of malaria.

(b) Extension of credit facilities to enterprising men and women who want to get involved in the informal sector of the economy and, in the process, attracting them away from the tedious stone crushing business and other less-rewarding activities.

(c) Ensuring that the relocation of shanty townships is conducted only after low-cost public housing units are provided by the government, and re-settlement areas are furni­shed with running wat­er, elec­tricity, public tran­sporta­tion routes and por­tals, and other essential public ser­vices and facili­ties.

(d) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for both rural and urban areas through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(e) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such schemes include the Chitope Resettlement Scheme in Luangwa district, the Kanakantapa Resettlement Scheme in Chongwe district, the Kasenga Resettlement Scheme in Chongwe district, the Mumpanshya Resettlement Scheme in Rufunsa district, the Mungu farm block in Kafue district, the Rufunsa Resettlement Scheme in Rufunsa district, and the Yapite Resettlement Scheme in Luangwa district.

6. Muchinga Province

6.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Muchinga Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—that is, Chinsali District, Isoka District, Mafinga District, Mpika District, and Nakonde district hospitals.

6.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Muchinga Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chinsali, Isoka, Mafinga, Mpika, and Nakonde districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Muchinga Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Muchinga Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Muchinga Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

6.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Muchinga Province, including the following:

(a) The Chinamanongo ceremony of the Bisa people in Senior Chief Kopa’s area in Mpika district held in September;

(b) The Vikamkanimba ceremony of the Tumbuka people in Senior Chief Muyombe’s area in Isoka district held in September;

(c) The Ng’ondo ceremony of the Namwanga people in Senior Chief Kafwimbi’s area in Isoka district held in November;

(d) The Mfungwe and Chambo Chalutanga ceremony in Chief Mwenechifungwe’s area in Isoka district held in September;

(e) The Mulasa ceremony of the Namwanga people in Chieftainess Nawaitwika’s area in Nakonde district held in September; and

(f) The Bisa Malaila ceremony of the Bisa people in Chief Nabwalya’s area in Mpika district held in September.

6.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Muchinga Province. Among other things, there is a need to:

(a) Provide material and financial support to facilitate the construction and maintenance of irrigation canals, dams, furrows, and boreholes throughout Muchinga Province. Successful irrigation schemes are an important element in efforts aimed at reducing poverty nationwide, particularly those which are designed to sustain local households through the growing and selling of beans, cabbages, carrots, fruits, groundnuts, maize, potatoes, sugar cane, tomatoes, and other crops. The agricultural schemes at Phillip Village in Chinsali District provide a good example.

(b) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such resettlement schemes include the Kanchibiya Resettlement Scheme in Mpika district, the Manshya farm block in Mpika district, the Mufubushi Resettlement Schemes in Mpika district, and the Chief Katyetye Resettlement Scheme in Isoka district.

(c) Improve the transportation infrastructure in the Province to facilitate and expedite the ferrying of agricultural produce, inputs and machinery and equipment by providing for an inter-modal network of all-season feeder roads, trunk roads, and bridges—including the Mbesuma Bridge in Chinsali district on the Chambeshi River that has already been earmarked for construction.

(d) Introduce widely accessible credit schemes, and also provide incentives for the establishment of privately owned facilities in the Province for processing, packaging and canning agricultural produce—including beans, carrots, cabbages and other kinds of vegetables, cassava, coffee, fish, fruits, groundnuts, maize, millet, potatoes, pumpkins, sorghum, sugar cane, and tomatoes. And

(e) Provide for seed and fertilizer subsidies at 50% in order to facilitate the growing of crops that are currently being grown through the citemene system mainly due to the high cost of agricultural inputs.

There is a need to also ensure that the tourism potential in Muchinga Province is fully exploited through:

(a) Maintenance of a network of well-maintained roads leading to waterfalls, lakes, beaches, wildlife sanctuaries in national parks, and other heritage sites—including the Nachikufu Cave in Mpika; and

(b) Inducement of private investments in the establishment and maintenance of tourism camps, lodges and hotels mainly through the Tourism Development Credit Facility (TDCF).

7. Northern Province

7.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Northern Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—that is, Luwingu District, Mporokoso, Kasama General, Mbala General, and Chilonga Mission hospitals.

7.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Northern Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chilubi, Kaputa, Kasama, Luwingu, Mbala, Mporokoso, Mpulungu, Mungwi, and Nsama districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Northern Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Northern Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Northern Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

7.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Northern Province, including the following:

(a) The Ukusefya Pa Ng’wena ceremony of the Bemba people in Paramount Chief Chitimukulu’s area in Mungwi district held in August;

(b) The Mukulu Pembe ceremony of the Bemba people in Senior Chief Chunga’s area in Luwingu district held in August;

(c) The Chisaka Chalubombo ceremony of the Bisa people in Chief Chiwanangala’s area in Chilubi district held in September; and

(d) The Mutomolo ceremony of the Mambwe people in Mambwe and Lungu Chiefs’ areas in Mbala district held in June.

7.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Northern Province. Among other things, there is a need to:

(a) Provide material and financial support to facilitate the construction and maintenance of irrigation canals, dams, furrows, and boreholes throughout the Northern Province. Successful irrigation schemes are an important element in efforts aimed at reducing poverty nationwide, as demonstrated by the Ngulula Village scheme situated 25 km from Kasama—which was initiated in 1955 and has continued to sustain local households through the growing and selling of beans, cabbages, carrots, fruits, groundnuts, maize, potatoes, sugar cane, tomatoes, and other crops.

Eventually, we expect the agricultural schemes at the Kabila Village in Kasama District, the Bulunda Village in Chief Mukonge’s area along the Luwingu road, and other similar sites and communities in the Province to be as productive as the Ngulula Village scheme.

(b) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such resettlement schemes include the Chamfubu Resettlement Scheme in Mungwi district, the Lufubu Resettlement Scheme in Luwingu district, the Lukulu South Resettlement Scheme in Kasama district, the Lupandizizi in Isoka district, the Milongo Resettlement Scheme in Isoka district, the Musanya Resettlement Scheme in Chinsali district, and the Musombizi Resettlement Scheme in Mpulungu district.

(c) Improve the transportation infrastructure in the Province to facilitate and expedite the ferrying of agricultural produce, inputs and machinery and equipment by providing for an inter-modal network of all-season feeder roads, trunk roads, and bridge.

(d) Introduce widely accessible credit schemes, and also provide incentives for the establishment of privately owned facilities in the Province for processing, packaging and canning agricultural produce—including beans, carrots, cabbages and other kinds of vegetables, cassava, coffee, fish, fruits, groundnuts, maize, millet, potatoes, pumpkins, sorghum, sugar cane, and tomatoes.

(e) Provide for seed and fertilizer subsidies at 50% in order to facilitate the growing of crops that are currently being grown through the citemene system mainly due to the high cost of agricultural inputs. And

(f) Provision for the construction of a magistrate’s court on Chilubi Island so that the police will not have to transport suspected law breakers to Samfya for court sessions.

There is a need to also ensure that the tourism potential in the Northern-Luapula Circuit is fully exploited through:

(a) Improved airport infrastructure at the Kasama Airport, the Kasaba Bay Airport, the Samora Machel Airport, and other airfields in the northern region, and the opening up of the Samora Machel Airport to civilian aircrafts;

(b) A network of well-maintained roads leading to waterfalls, lakes, beaches, wildlife sanctuaries in national parks, and other heritage sites—including the Chishimba Falls National Monument in Kasama, Kalambo Falls and the Moto Moto Museum in Mbala, the Ntumbachushi Falls in Kawambwa, the Lumangwe Falls in Mporokoso, and the Mwela Rock Art site in Kasama; and

(c) Inducement of private investments in the establishment and maintenance of tourism camps, lodges and hotels mainly through the Tourism Development Credit Facility (TDCF).

8. North-Western Province

(Important projects and programmes that will need to be tended to in North-Western Province were discussed in a separate article entitled “Development in North-Western Province.”)

Development in North-Western Province

9. Southern Province

9.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Southern Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—including the Gwembe, Kalomo, Zimba Mission, Kafue Gorge, Mazabuka, Chikombola, Research Station Clinic, Riverside Farm Clinic, Chikuni Mission, Stage II, Namwala, Mtendere, Siavonga, Maamba, Choma General, Macha Mission, Livingstone, Chikankata, and Monze Mission medical centres.

9.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Southern Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts—that is, in Chikankata, Choma, Gwembe, Kalomo, Kazungula, Livingstone, Mazabuka, Monze, Namwala, Pemba, Siavonga, Sinazongwe, and Zimba districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Southern Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Southern Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Southern Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

9.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Southern Province, including the following:

(a) The Lwiindi ceremony of the Toka Leya people in Chief Mukuni’s area in Livingstone district held in January;

(b) The Lwiindi Gonde ceremony of the Tonga people in Chief Monze’s area in Monze district held in July;

(c) The Chungu ceremony of the Tonga people in Chief Chikanta’s area in Kalomo district held in October;

(d) The Lukuni Luzwa Buuka ceremony of the Toka Leya people in Chief Musokotwane’s area in Kazungula district held in August;

(e) The Maanzi Aabila Lwiindi ceremony of the Tonga people in Chiefs Mutondo and Siachitema’s areas in Kalomo district held in October; and

(f) The Shimunenga ceremony of the Ila people of Namwala district held between September and October at Maala on the Kafue Flats, celebrated by Ila people from Chiefs Chilyabufu, Mukobela, Shezongo, Nalubamba, Mungaila, and Shimbihi.

8.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Southern Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Planning adequately for both the prevention and the containment of diseases like the Contagious Bovine Pleuro-Pneumonia (CBPP) disease (which recently hit the border area between Kazungula district in Southern Province and Sesheke district in Western Province) and effective control of the tse-tse fly in order to reduce the incidence of sleeping sickness.

(b) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water throughout the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(c) Completion of the construction of irrigation schemes at Simupande, Nzenga and Sinazongwe, including the electrification of the three irrigation schemes. Moreover, there is a need to ensure that the dam at Buleya Malima irrigation scheme in Sinazongwe district will be rehabilitated and maintained on a regular basis.

(d) Provide incentives for the exploration of gas and oil deposits at Kanesiya stream near Sianeja in Senior Chief Mweemba’s kingdom in Sinazongwe district.

(e) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities.

Such schemes include the Harmony Resettlement Scheme in Choma district, the Kabuyu Resettlement Scheme in Kazungula district, the Kalomo West Resettlement Scheme in Kalomo district, the Kasiya Resettlement Scheme in Livingstone district, the Neganega Resettlement Scheme in Mazabuka district, the Ngabo Resettlement Scheme in Namwala district, the Siamambo Resettlement Scheme in Choma district, the Sibanyati Resettlement Scheme in Choma district, and the Simango farm bloc in Livingstone district.

10. Western Province

10.1 Public Health and Sanitation. There is a need to continue to provide for free life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health centres throughout Western Province, as well as build new ones. Moreover, there is a need to improve conditions of service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries or the government.

The government’s efforts in these endeavours will also need to apply to major healthcare facilities in the province—that is, the Kalabo, Yuka Mission, Kaoma District, Luampa, Mangango, Lukulu, Senanga District, Yeta District, Mwandi Mission, Sichili Mission, and Lewanika hospitals.

10.2 Education and Skills Training. There is a need to build more primary and secondary schools in Western Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to make it possible for each and every child in the Province to have access to education near their homes in all the districts – that is, in Kalabo, Kaoma, Lukulu, Lwampa, Mitete, Mongu, Mulobezi, Nalolo, Senanga, Sesheke, Shang’ombo, Sikongo, and Sioma districts.

Besides, there is a need to ensure that higher education and vocational training in Western Province are enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to offer training programmes that will be consistent with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, there is a need to provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the Province.

Further, there is a need to address the problems facing educational and training institutions, including the lack of teachers, instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment, inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all the educational and training institutions in Western Province.

There is a need to also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up their money only to be told that their dues are not yet available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’ physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and productive citizens, there is a need to promote sport throughout Western Province. In this endeavour, there is a need to provide sports facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

10.3 Culture and Local Traditions. It is important to consider culture and both family and traditional values as essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society. Therefore, there is a need to make an earnest effort to promote cultural and traditional events in Western Province, including the following:

(a) The Kuomboka Nalolo ceremony of the Lozi people in Litunga Lamboela’s area in Senanga district held in May;

(b) The Kuomboka Libonda ceremony of the Lozi people in Chieftainess Mboanjikana’s area in Kalabo district held in May; and

(c) The Kazanga (Kathanga) ceremony of the Nkoya people in Chiefs Kahare and Mutondo Muchaila’s areas in Kaoma district held in July.

10.4 Other Projects and Programmes. There are a lot of important projects and programmes that there is a need to work on in Western Province designed to improve the socioeconomic well-being of residents. These projects and programmes include the following:

(a) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water in the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(b) Completion of the 50 km road from Uwee to Mongu through Nangula, and upgrading and maintenance of the Limulunga-Ushaa-Lukulu Road.

(c) Construction of Kalongola Bridge on the Zambezi River and Liyoyelo Bridge on the Mongu-Kalabo Road, and maintenance of all other bridges throughout the province—including foot bridges.

(d) Allocation of adequate resources for upgrading and expansion of the Lewanika School of Nursing, and construction of a new District Hospital in Mongu district.

(e) Provision of incentives for the establishment of processing industries for cotton, timber, leather, mangoes, fish, tobacco, paprika, rice, cassava, and cashew nuts.

(f) Planning adequately for both the prevention and the containment of diseases like the Contagious Bovine Pleuro-Pneumonia (CBPP) disease (which recently hit the border area between Kazungula district in Southern Province and Sesheke district in Western Province) and effective control of the tse-tse fly in order to reduce the incidence of sleeping sickness—particularly in Kaoma and Shang’ombo districts.

(g) Improvement of the road infrastructure in the province through the construction and/or rehabilitation of the Mongu-Lusaka Road, Mongu-Senanga Road, Senanga-Sesheke Road, Katunda-Lukulu Road, Mongu-Lukulu Road, Senanga-Kalabo Road, Kalabo-Sikongo Road, and the Luampa-Machile Road. It is also important to provide for the rehabilitation of the Mulobezi railway line.

(h) Exploitation of waterfalls like the Sioma for hydro-electric power, and the sandy soils found in much of the Province for glass manufacturing. There is also a need to provide for the re-opening of Mulobezi Sawmills in order to boost economic activity and the creation of employment opportunities in the Province.

(i) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by providing financial and material resources for constructing and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics, basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services and facilities. Such schemes include the Kalumwange Resettlement Scheme in Kaoma district, and the Lombelombe Resettlement Scheme in Kaoma district.

15 COMMENTS

  1. When your articles begin to attract less comments it’s just normal that you introspect, are they boring or people doubt your sanity?

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  2. Meaningless as long as action is in doubt. UPND can never deliver on this…. Look at Southern province where they reign supreme

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  3. The man is trying to get back to Zambia by appearing to be relevant to the UPND failed political project. Come 12 August, UPND will be politically buried and Kyambalesa will still be languishing in the US. Just come back on your own. There is plenty of land in Northwestern Province Dr, Kyambalesa where you can start fish farming which earns you many thousands of kwacha even in one month. Osakalilila kwa bene.

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  4. Does Kyambalesa earn anything spending too much time writing such rubbish. If he was spending his time doing reasonable things he would not be looking like an undernourished mad person. HH please take care of your cadres. Look at how dirty they look. Look at the state in which Chellah Tukuta is now.

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  5. By the end of today, I doubt if 10 people would have the energy and time to read the long senseless article. Honestly, less than 2 weeks from elections a is this the campaign UPND are running on Social Media to win votes.

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  6. Henry is debating issues. Unfortunately, Hakainde, will not allow UPND MPs to debate in Parliament or work with any government in power other than an HH government.
    People like Henry should be allowed to serve in government regardless of their political affiliation.

    Henry is a new Zambian. He was probably just a baby in the UNIP era. His suggestions have been promised before. Implemention has always been the problem. HH is unlikely to come up with a solution.

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  7. Debt swap is win-win scenario. Instead of waiting for relatively long period of time, it is rational to accept debt swap. Debts owed to public and private institutions would be cancelled in exchange for debts owed to public service workers. This innovative arrangement is not compulsory. Any individual is free to continue waiting for cash owed by public institutions to public service workers. Job creation without infrastructure is not feasible. Job creations needs electric power, roads and organized internal and external markets

  8. Ba BF na ulta ! They hate the truth nowonder this country has collapsed because they have taken it as if it belongs to the three regions. In short this country has been ruined by the bembas because they control the most delicate ministries namely finance, national planning, infrastructure, tourism, agriculture and transport. No one can run away from this fact because it is the truth.

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  9. Debt swapping is a workable project that helps both lender and borrower get the best out if the ongoing loan. If anything, civil servants have more cash home take.; no pressure on paying back; the terms cand conditions are altered to reduce stress. The civil servants are themselves happy with this government initiative who don’t need a long flawed analysis from anyone.

  10. Too long and too late to tweek any voter’s interest. This is more like a dissertation than a campaign message. Good luck though because ordinary Zambians care less about such thesis, but what is obtaining on the ground.

  11. Some Zambians surprise me — they want a one-page article on development projects and programmes in the country’s 10 provinces. I guess they are accustomed to one-line or one-paragraph comments of Kaizar Zulu’s unwarranted profanity; to them and to KZ, that is about development policies.

  12. Dr. Kasonde Makasa: You don’t think the “debt forgiveness” initiative suggested by the author would have been more beneficial to civil servants who are in debt through pay-roll loans and who had loans with shylocks and had already budgeted for the pending money from the government?

  13. The Observer, I don’t know what you really mean by “Kyambalesa will still be languishing in the US.” I came to the United States a few years ago. Man, it is wonderful over here! I used to wonder why some people would risk crossing oceans and deserts to reach any of the of the world’s industrialized countries. I would stick around here even if it means working as a janitor than rushing back home where even government ministers depend on the Food Reserve Agency for their subsistence. I have a simple job but I drive a ministerial type of car, I live in a nice apartment with running water and no black-outs with respect to electricity. Food is plentiful. And there are countless pleasure resorts for relaxation. I only pray for good health, strength and courage to keep myself going, although…

  14. … I deeply miss one thing — my family back home. I wish I could find a fast way to get my wife and kids to join me so that they can have access to quality education and quality healthcare. I have met a few Zambians who have their families with them; they all seem to be enjoying their stay across this side of the world.

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