Wednesday, May 29, 2024

Behavioral change is key to the success of fighting corruption in the country

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The Anti-Corruption Commission Director General Tom Trevor Shamakamba has said behavioral change is key to the success of fighting corruption in the country.

Mr. Shamakamba said the fight against corruption would be null and void without behavioral change among citizens.

The Anti-Corruption Commission Director General was speaking to journalists in Ndola on the Copperbelt when he officially opened a training workshop for media personnel.

Mr. Shamakamba challenged the media to engage in investigative journalism and sensitizing members of the public on the importance of respecting the public good and, to also bring to light the adverse effects of corruption.

“It is with great delight that I welcome you all to this important training workshop which is aimed at building the capacity of the media personnel in anti-corruption issues. The main objective of the workshop is to encourage you to begin to engage in investigative journalism and sensitizing members of the public on the importance of respecting the public good and, to also bring to light the adverse effects of corruption on the social and economic development of the country. This workshop is therefore meant to help you fully understand the different dimensions of corruption. This is because of the key role that you play in passing on the information to the general public. In other words, this initiative cannot yield the expected results without your full and effective contribution. As the fourth estate, you the media are a great partner in this fight and national development,” Mr. Shamakamba stated.

He said there was a need to be consistent in developing and disseminating anti- corruption messages in order to bring about permanent transformation in individuals in Zambia.

“It is undeniable that the media plays a critical role in disseminating information or raising awareness on what the public can do to prevent corruption and in facilitating behavioral change. As you may be well aware, behavioral change is key to the success of fighting corruption in the country without which, the fight would be null and void. It is also important to note that change of mindset does not occur overnight; instead it calls for resilience and perseverance by those of us including you colleagues, entrusted with the responsibility to create public awareness on corruption. In this regard, we need to be consistent in developing and disseminating anti- corruption messages in order to bring about permanent transformation in individuals. It is this transformation that will bring about behavioral change in the citizens and residents so that they begin to hate, detest and abhor corruption in totality,” Mr. Shamakamba said.

He added that the media fraternity is strategically positioned to unearth corrupt activities that are taking place in the country.

“The media fraternity world over is expected to be more proactive in educating the masses on what constitutes corruption, its dangers and the negative effect it has on individuals, society and the nation at large. Further, the media fraternity is strategically positioned to be able to unearth corrupt activities that are taking place in the country. For this reason, the commission regards the media fraternity as an indispensable partner in the fight against corruption,” Mr. Shamakamba said.

“In conclusion, allow me to re- emphasise the critical role that you play in the fight against corruption. The success of the country in terms of its socio-economic development largely depends on the successful fight against corruption. This will be scored if the media positions itself in playing its critical role of raising awareness as well as unearthing all unethical conduct in the country, so that the culprits can be made to account for their deeds. I therefore implore you to take advantage of this training to learn more about corruption so that you can effectively participate in the fight against the vice,” he concluded.

2 COMMENTS

  1. In 1980, an Indian bought one of the cars assembled at Rover Zambia in Ndola which he wanted to export to India. Tubeless tyres were just becoming trendy. He loaded 000s of dollars in the tyres and inflated them. The excitement about the rare export of a Zambian made vehicle died when it was impounded at Lusaka International Airport and the illegal export of dollars exposed. Shortly thereafter the Kanyama disaster scandal followed when K85,000 allocated to deal with the floods was stolen. I remember how upset KK was. There were claims that Indians were slowly introducing corruption in Zambia. We resented corruption at that time but it’s now embraced in almost all spheres of life. Can we get back to those days? It requires more than a mere call

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