Garbage nice house in the background

ZAMBIA has been listed among 10 of the world’s most unequal countries.

According to the Gini Coefficient Index (a standard measure of income equality), the 10 most unequal countries in the world are: South Africa (65), Namibia (61.3), Botswana (60.5), Zambia (57.5), Honduras (57.4), Central African Republic (56.3), Lesotho (54.2), Colombia (53.2), Brazil (52.7) and Guatemala (52.4).

The African Development Bank Group (AfDB) said in its 2014 annual report released yesterday that for a continent which has consistently posted robust economic growth in the past decade, recent reports that the continent is the bastion of inequality recording 42.6 on the GNI is quite disturbing.

The GNI provides evidence suggesting that rich Africans, who account for less than five percent of the population, hold about 20 percent of total income while the poor who account for 60.8 percent of the population own 36.5 percent of the continent’s total income.

“Africa is the world’s most unequal continent after Latin America. Six of the 10 most unequal countries are in Africa,” the African Development AfDB said in its 2014 annual report released on Wednesday at its annual meetings in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.

The AfDB acknowledges that while Africa has grown at an unprecedented pace in the past decade, the benefits of the economic resurgence have not been broadly shared.

“Instead, growth has been concentrated in particular sectors or geographical areas within countries, excluding large sections of people,” the AfDB says.

The AfDB argues that growth must be more inclusive in order to lift the majority of Africans out of poverty by creating employment opportunities through a better business and investment climate that enables the private sector to thrive; and connecting remote areas to growth poles through better infrastructure and deeper regional integration within countries and across national borders.

In addition, effective transformation of Africa’s natural wealth into created wealth, including building human capital and skills and addressing climate change to ensure a smooth transition towards an environmentally sustainable growth path, would further promote inclusive growth.

The AfDB defines inclusive growth as economic growth that results in a wider access to sustainable livelihood opportunities for a broader number of people, regions, or countries, while protecting the vulnerable, all in an environment of fairness, equity, and political plurality.

These concerns were addressed in the AfDB’s 2013-2022 10-year strategy which focuses on infrastructure development, regional economic integration, private sector development, governance and accountability, skills and technology as the main channels through which the ban will deliver its work and improve the quality of growth in Africa. It will also seek new and creative ways of mobilising resources to support Africa’s transformation, especially by leveraging its own resources.

Wider use of public-private partnerships, co-financing arrangements and risk-mitigation instruments will also attract investors.

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16 COMMENTS

  1. Good,
    These people should suffer and continue using pit latrines. That’s what they vote for. How many times have we been to the poles.
    Good. More beggars please.
    Regards

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    • These indicators are related to acquisition of such wealth by the few mostly through corruption . How else can it be explained that so few people have amassed so much wealth yet they most have not established industries adding value to exports from their countries where such exports are still in raw form?

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    • Zambia’s suffering is not of a political problem, it is of the third world mentality of the entire nation. Zambians are content with complaining and receiving donor aid without lifting a finger at improving themselves. They would rather fight for lions in the game reserve than for themselves.

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    • Yes it is very true because of how the so called KK raised Zambia, he only taught Zambians about going back to the land but him has left yet. He only believed in “limit is the sky” and not “sky is the limit”. Had it not been for FTJ to come into power, my generation could’ve followed the same boat. All what I saw from my fellow Zambians is the “TULYEMO FORM OF CORRUPTION”. For it was what I can do for myself. After secondary, was fortunate to attend college and worked for 7 years. Lost hope in my country that does not want to reinvate itself but cry about the copper prices all the time. Today, Zambia is worse than the way could’ve turned out to be if the country had followed Simon Mwansa Kampwepwe’s policy of Governing the country left with so much money by the British colony.

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  2. This report is not true, were do you put DR Congo, Tanzania, Gabon, Mozambique, Malawi, Senegal and India.

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    • @pio, you are arguing based on subjective and perceptive studies. A simple question: why are you now racing to India for medical attention? Here is another trick question: how is it that despite low English penetration Tanzania has a higher per capita literacy capacity (retained within) at postgraduate than Zambia? How attractive is your social and sporting environs compared to DRC? Aside from these you see that the spread of basic goods and services in the countries you cite is far more superior than in Zambia. Need I say more!?

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  3. pemalink u are looking at names of countries things are changing for the better in the countries u mentioned but in zambia u have to be a member oe fp for u to eat look at gbm’s trucks do u know the where abouts

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  4. This report is a true reflection of what is going on in mosi of the African countries. Top 10 or top 50, wealth distribution is very poor in Zambia. Just look around yourself as an individual, most likely you oranother 2 didistant cousins in a family of 50 are financially supporting the rest in terms of living and basic survival. Running away from the truth will never help us people. Identifying the problem is one step in addressing it. Another thing, politicians are incapable of resolving this issue

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  5. very sad …..its true the distribution of wealth is terrible but don`t confuse this with the overall gini coefficent as South Africa or Zambia are now where near places like DR congo, Niger…..you only see how really poor zambia is when you travel outside the cities ,mining will not uplift us but agriculture will

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  6. Yes it is very true because of how the so called raised Zambia, he only taught Zambians about going back to the land but him has left yet. He only believed in “limit is the sky” and not “sky is the limit”. Had it not been for FTJ to come into power, my generation could’ve followed the same boat. All what I saw from my fellow Zambians is the “TULYEMO FORM OF CORRUPTION”. For it was what I can do for myself. After secondary, was fortunate to attend college and worked for 7 years. Lost hope in my country that does not want to reinvate itself but cry about the copper prices all the time. Today, Zambia is worse than the way could’ve turned out to be if the country had followed Simon Mwansa Kampwepwe’s policy of Governing the country left with so much money by the British colony.

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  7. Very true indeed and one only needs to look around one’s own environment to agree with the reality of the report. Many will want to argue in denial than look seriously into remedies.

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  8. Yes, Zambia is a lower middle income country with about $1,500 per capita as GNP or whatever you call it and yet there is massive poverty in the country with government officials especialliy in the MOH paying lip service to poverty alleviation while busy lining their pockets. South Africa is a middle income country with a GNP of $8,500 and yet shacks mushroom while the president spends 250m Rands on his homestead all in the name of security.

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  9. A friend in Luapula tells me PS there is no longer employing 40 and above year olds, on the way to create more inequalities.Is this a new policy directive after the 65 year retire’ age? Can someone please clarify this nonsense?

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