President Edgar Chagwa Lungu passes on Great North Road during the tour of Lusaka Roads under the L-400 Project on Saturday, September 15, 2018. PICTURE BY SALIM HENRY/STATE HOUSE 2018
President Edgar Chagwa Lungu passes on Great North Road during the tour of Lusaka Roads under the L-400 Project on Saturday, September 15, 2018. PICTURE BY SALIM HENRY/STATE HOUSE 2018

The National Road Fund Agency (NRFA) has embarked on a review of the draft NRFA bill with members of the public across the country to ensure their satisfaction with its contents.

The agency is conducting the meetings with the public in all areas where they got submissions last year for the amendment of the NRFA act of 2002.

ZANIS reports that NRFA legal counsel, Constantine Hara said his during a consultative meeting held with various stakeholders in Solwezi yesterday.

Mr Hara stated that the agency found it necessary to amend the Act because the mandate of the institution has expanded due to developments which have taken place since 2002 such as the setting up of toll gates in the country.

“There are some things that have come on board since the enactment of the NRFA act of 2002 which has expanded the scope of our mandate as an agency.

“For example, the operations of toll gates such as the Humphrey Mulemba toll gate here in Solwezi is not catered for in the Act as it was not in existence at that time,” Mr. Hara said.

Mr. Hara said the new Act will still maintain some provisions of the old Act which have proved to be effective and those which are standard for every Act.

He commended the public for submitting their recommendations for the new Act last year adding that the response was overwhelming.

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7 COMMENTS

  1. Remove those mosquitoe provisions such as stupid reflective stickers on cars. We are in the 21st Century bane. Also, do something about your speed limits. They surely suck! You cannot be on a highway at 80km/h. Takwaba.

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    • When did SAFETY become old fashioned? I thought that’s what reflective stickers are for and they are very effective. You use stickers so that you can easily be seen by other motorists, for example at night when you are broken down on the side of the road and your hazards/lights are turned off or not working.

      And what is the 21st century technology that has replaced reflective stickers if I may ask? Here in the U.S. in fact, you can NOT drive certain vehicles (especially commercial types) without reflective stickers in designated areas of the vehicle…..it is against the law and if caught by High Patrol can cost you big time!

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    • @Yambayamba, do not conflate matters. When last were you in Zed? The latest vehicles need to affix extra reflective stickers. Trucks are still required to have reflective material. Smaller cars have gone far beyond that. Nanga vonse mweo ni ndale cabe? Do you have extra stickers on your personal car as an aftermarket requirement by act of Congress? Yaba!

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    • @kaloko, you can not compare U.S. roads/highways to Zambian roads. Most Zambian roads, if not all, barely have a shoulder for you to park safely when you are broken down on the highway and your car can’t be removed immediately. So you need those reflective stickers on all cars for this reason. How many accidents have you heard parked/broken down cars being hit on Zambian roads? The answer is PLENTY!

      And I trust people in charge to make such assessments about issues of road safety and make necessary laws than you couch critics you just want to rant for nothing. Are you telling me these stickers are required just to inconvenience Zambian motorists?

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