Saturday, June 15, 2024

DBZ MD, Dr Samuel Bwalya sentenced to 15 months in prison with hard labour for abuse of office

Share

Former Development Bank of Zambia (DBZ) managing director, Dr Samuel Bwalya, has been sentenced to 15 months in prison with hard labour for abuse of office. The decision was handed down by Magistrate Faides Hamaundu after Dr Bwalya was found guilty of initiating the payment of school fees for his children by pressuring his co-workers to process when he was not entitled to education allowance as claimed.

Dr Bwalya was facing 12 counts of abuse of authority of office involving K781,195.78, and the particulars of the offence in the matter were that he committed the offence between May 1, 2020 and July 30, 2021, as a public officer, namely, managing director for Development Bank of Zambia.

During the trial, Magistrate Hamaundu found that Dr Bwalya had abused his position of authority by falsely claiming education allowances for his children, despite not being entitled to such benefits. The magistrate stated that it was evident that Dr Bwalya had initiated the payment of school fees for his children by pressuring his co-workers to process when he was not entitled.

The conviction and sentencing of Dr Bwalya send a strong message to public officials that they will be held accountable for any abuse of authority. The court’s decision also serves as a warning to individuals who may be tempted to abuse their positions of power for personal gain.

Speaking after the ruling, the prosecution team welcomed the verdict, saying that it was a clear indication that the judiciary was committed to fighting corruption and ensuring that public officials are held accountable for their actions.

The defense team, however, expressed their disappointment with the ruling and stated that they would appeal the decision. They argued that the evidence presented during the trial did not prove beyond reasonable doubt that Dr Bwalya had abused his office.

The sentencing of Dr Bwalya comes at a time when the Zambian government is making efforts to address corruption and improve accountability in the public sector. In recent years, there has been an increasing demand from civil society and the international community for stronger action to be taken against corruption.

The conviction and sentencing of Dr Bwalya are expected to provide a boost to the government’s efforts to improve governance and accountability in the country. It is hoped that the ruling will serve as a deterrent to other public officials who may be considering abusing their positions of power for personal gain.

the sentencing of Dr Bwalya for abuse of office sends a strong message to public officials that corruption will not be tolerated in Zambia. The judiciary’s commitment to fighting corruption and holding public officials accountable for their actions is a positive step towards improving governance and promoting transparency and accountability in the country.

20 COMMENTS

  1. I think his lawyers did not act in his best interests. They should have negotiated for reimbursement of the money instead of sending him to jail. If Faith Musonda is free, why not him who got far less money?

    6
    1
    • The lawyers did a good job..you dont know why Faith Musonda is free? Its not her money but bigger fish were behind that debacle…my friend you only cut a deal when you have something to bring to the day especially know that the govt wants to be seen to act tough.

    • when you have something to bring to the table…especially now that the govt wants to be seen to act tough on corruption.

  2. He did it for his children’s education. I have respect for that. Those in upnd are stealing for their own personal gain . In 2026 we will go after them

    2
    6
    • Look at this Humpty Dumpty UK based Troll only a few years ago it was critcial of people in diaspora now here is a man who was sending his children overseas universities and it supports it. That’s the problem with trolling and being an impostor who stand for nothing.

      2
      1
    • Yes he did that money should have been used to support SMEs by DBZ someone was deprived of it and their company collapsed…do you know how much it is to send one person to UK for education and accomodation plus food a year..its close to £30,000 a year and these spoiled kids of today are not like us who used to do part-time work in hotels and McDonalds.

  3. A villager stumbles into a National Park to go and dig up some mice and he is slapped with a K120,000 charge or 5 years …this man is busy using his position to force his juniors to create fake allowances for him so he can send his kids abroad at the expense of the company and he gets a mere 15 months. This man must have fired or transfered anyone who dared to oppose him ..he should have got more as he will be out after 7 months.

  4. In criminal matters relating to financial loss against the state, the primary aim is asset recovery and not to send people to jail. Keeping people in prison is a cost to the state.

    • Why not both…people should be sent to jail to pay for their crimes this sends a clear message to other high ranking officals not to abuse the positions.

    • You must have a corrupt mindset to think everyone should pay for the crimes through cash…what of the poor who steal its okay to send them to prison

  5. This man PAID every ngwee back!! his in jail because his a Bwalya fullstop! all his co workers who testified that he was entitled like any other past MD were immediately suspended and still are suspended from DBZ! this is a kangaroo court and tribal UPND!

  6. this man is in jail because his name is Bwalya! the co workers that testified that he was entitled to benefits like any other past MD were all promptly suspended the next day! This is political and the tribal UPND who by the way forget that without all Zambia voting for them they would be still irrelevant. This is a kangaroo judiciary !

Comments are closed.

Read more

Local News

Discover more from Lusaka Times-Zambia's Leading Online News Site - LusakaTimes.com

Subscribe now to keep reading and get access to the full archive.

Continue reading