Tuesday, July 16, 2024

Exposing Political Manipulation by the “Church Elder” Hakainde Hichilema

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By Misheck Kakonde

Today, we face a bitter truth of political betrayal and evasion. We were promised a future where corruption would be rooted out, the economy would thrive, jobs would abound, taxes would ease, and crucial sectors like healthcare, education, and agriculture would flourish. These were not mere campaign slogans but solemn commitments from the “church elder” Mr Hakainde Hichilema.

Instead of progress, we are offered excuses and selective references to scripture. Leaders now cite Hunger as Biblical, while in Matthew 25:35 Jesus calls for compassion towards the hungry and needy, not as a rallying cry for action but as a shield against accountability. This is not leadership banene; it is a betrayal of trust.

Matthew 25:35 does not absolve leaders from the consequences of failed governance. It demands compassion and decisive action qualities lacking in those who now use it to deflect criticism while our people suffer.

True leadership is judged by actions not by how many international trips one has had, not how many press engagements one has, not mere words, but by integrity, transparency, and an unwavering commitment to every citizens well-being. It means honoring pledges made to voters, not discarding them once in power.

The church elder and his team must uphold their promises. Leadership is a sacred trust, not a license to avoid responsibility. It is not a license for warming plane chairs every week, neither is it a license for giving tax holidays in the mining sector or any other sector at the expense of the common man in Zambia.

In media addresses that do not hold any water, presidents must not hide behind empty rhetoric or sidestep pressing national issues. We demand answers on critical matters: questionable land allocations agreements at ZDA with Vietnamese, the rise of political violence by UPND caders, concrete plans to combat hunger,updates on abducted MPs, the currency's performance, measures, and the protection of national resources like Kansensenli gold Mine.

A president must prioritize domestic concerns over international travel, demonstrating a commitment to Zambia, not globetrotting. We seek updates on diplomatic efforts been undertaken with neighboring countries that fill insecure with our actions as a nation, not irrelevant religious references and playing to the public gallery.

Zambians seek economic progress, not religious lectures. Enough evasion and deflection. Our nation needs accountable leadership, rooted in action and responsibility.

Therefore, ba church elder, remember that the scripture above does not absolve leaders; it reminds you to act decisively for the common good. We demand leaders who fulfill promises and prioritize peoples needs.

Our future hinges on it, not of using scriptures for political advancements.Lastly, rallies for opposition leaders must be given as Zambia is not a banana republic.

The author is a legal scholar, comparative politics specialist.

6 COMMENTS

  1. The author is firm and objective. I uphold you for stating the truth. May God bless you abundantly.

  2. In everything that HH promised, he failed to demonstrate how he was going to achieve. His statements were hollow. Those of us that pointed out this aren’t surprised because we knew that the didn’t have any program for Zambia. We’re not shocked that the man has lamentably failed. His ardent praise singers still believe that the man will score if all opposition members stop pointing out his shortcomings. But where on earth have you ever seen such a democracy?

  3. They tell lies easier than than breathing.
    Even when their ERB explains the reduction on fuel prices based on dollar status they fail to make sense.

  4. I pray Kapinga HH political analyst reads this understands that the church elder is a liar and my prayer is that he doesn’t tell lies to his church members

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